Winter just won’t let go of northern Maine. We’re finally above 0 degrees farenheit. (We recorded some outrageously stupid temperature like -40F.) First time in a week we’re actually hitting the double digits above 0. But now we’re getting buried in snow! I hate to wish away time, but is it spring yet?

So the teacher in me decided to share 13 facts about snow. I’m not sure how the guys snuck in there. But try to suffer through the pictures if you don’t mind.

1. Almost 15.5 feet (475 cm) fell in Alaska over a 7 day period in 1957. (Well, with weather like that, you might as well crawl in bed and stay there.)

2. Snowflakes start as ice crystals that are the size of a speck of dust. When the crystals fall they join up with other crystals to form a snowflake which usually has six sides. (And six well-defined abdominal muscles is also a very pretty arrangement.)

3. In the early 1900s, skiers created their own terminology to describe types of snow, including the terms “fluffy snow,” “powder snow,” and “sticky snow.” Later, the terminology expanded to include descriptive terms such as “champagne powder,” “corduroy,” and “mashed potatoes.” (And I’m sure they’d name this one “yuuuummmy”.)

4. Each year an average of 105 snow-producing storms affect the continental United States. A typical storm will have a snow-producing lifetime of two to five days and will bring snow to portions of several states. (I don’t know ladies, do you think there’s enough of this guy to spread around?)

5. Snow at the North and South Pole reflect heat into space!! That happens because the ice acts like a mirror with the heat of the sun, and the heat bounces off the ice and into space. (Mirrors always seem to bounce spectacular views.)

6. Mt Kilimanjaro in Tanzania is the only permanent snowcap within sight of the equator. (Of course if you’re looking really close, you may find something even more appealing within sight of the equator.)

7. There is NOT a law of nature that prohibits 2 snowflakes from being identical. (This is also true of humans.)

8. The largest piece of ice to fall to earth was an ice block 6 meters (20 ft) across that fell in Scotland on 13 August 1849. (If this guy was around … it would have melted quickly!)

9. Practically every location in the United States has seen snowfall. Even most portions of southern Florida have seen a few snow flurries. (This poor darling seems to be in desperate need of some ice … come visit me pretty boy.)

10. In Australia, snowfalls are common above 1,500m in the Alps during the winter, but there are no permanent snowfields anywhere on the continent. (It’s probably better if these gentlemen don’t worry about cold weather anyway.)

11. I heard once that snowflakes were pieces of clouds shaken loose when the angels danced with God. (Well, if that’s who’s dancing, who am I to be upset about some snow?)

12. Snow can be further classified into six basic patterns called: Needles, columns, plates, columns capped with plates, dendrites, and stars. (And these gentlemen can be classified as tall, dark, and dangerous.)

13. When cloud temperatures are at the freezing point or below, and there is an ample supply of moisture in the air, ice crystals form around a core particle. As water vapor condenses and freezes, the complex pattern of a snowflake is born, one molecule at a time. A snowflake’s hexagonal shape is born at the atomic level. It is here that water molecules bond together into … (Yeah, yeah whatever … bring on the eye candy!)

0 Responses to Snow Kidding!

  • Hi Nina,

    I’m sure there are additional interesting tidbits about snow, aren’t there? LIke, maybe you should rename this post “thursday THIRTY”.

    Thanks for all the eye candy. Almost makes this fluffy white stuff worth the trouble!!!



  • LOL! Cute blog! Love the last pic. Very inspiring.

  • Ah, the lovely fellows… keep ’em coming!

  • Luanna – 30? *smacks head* silly me, why did I stop at 13? LOL!

    Viola – Thanks for visiting. Happy T13!

    Anny – I can guarantee there will be more yummy candy in the coming weeks. Beautiful men are truly a writer’s inspiration.

  • LOL So who wants to read about snow when there’s all the beautiful scenery? I’m so glad we don’t get snow in Auckland. Rain, I can deal with no problem. Snow is plain depressing after a while.

  • Oh yes … let me die happy right now. *drooooool* Have a great weekend, Nina! *HUGS*

  • Shelley – Oh, no snow? Be still my heart!

    Stephanie – Here’s a tissue you’ve got a little something still on your chin. Enjoy your weekend as well! And here’s wishing you sweet dreams with wonderful visions!

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